Rolling out a new mail server - part 2

Rolling out a new mail server - part 2

 21.09.2012, last updated 05.03.2021 -  Jeremy T. Bouse

If you’re not going to try running this under AWS then you can pretty much skip on ahead to the rest of the configuration. So the obvious place to start is in setting up the EC2 instance. If you just want to test this out a t1.micro instance is plenty big enough and the on-demand pricing to run it for a few days won’t cost a lot. In fact if you just signed up for Amazon Web Services you could run a t1.

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Rolling out a new mail server

Rolling out a new mail server

 21.09.2012, last updated 05.03.2021 -  Jeremy T. Bouse

So for the past few years I’ve been content to outsource my email services to Web.com ¬†with very few problems though lately I’ve had a few contacts report problems sending me email and I’ve ran into issues where they don’t implement certain features I prefer to use (most notably user+extension email addressing). With that in mind I’ve set out to setup and re-implement my own mail server management and to ‘eat my own dog food’ as a consultant specializing in cloud service management I thought implementing it within Amazon Web Services .

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Ruby on Rails hosting by Web.com

Ruby on Rails hosting by Web.com

 07.02.2010, last updated 05.03.2021 -  Jeremy T. Bouse

Usually in the past I’ve done my web hosting on either one of the many servers I own or utilizing VPS hosting providers like VPSfarm.com , GrokThis.net  or¬†Linode.com , but lately with the economy and a price that can’t be beat I’ve been using Web.com  Linux Hosting plan to meet my needs. This has met all my requirements except one, I couldn’t run my Ruby on Rails applications that I was working on development for using their services.

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